FAQs

FAQs

Welcome to our FAQ sections, where you get to ask Rick!

Dear Rick:

After my lawn came in, weeds were also starting to thrive. What can I do to fix this?

Answer:

If this is the first year your lawn has been in, be patient with the weeds. They're easy enough to get rid of next season, and you don't want to put harsh chemicals on the young yard. Continue fertilizing this season, and next season plan to start with weed killers. Depending on the types of weeds, you may need to apply some treatments in the spring before the growth reappears. May and September are the best times to control crabgrass and similar weeds.


Dear Rick:

Why do I have weeds? There are so many, and my builder put in clean top soil. I thought the mixture you spray contains only grass seed?

Answer:

Soil will always have some plant matter in it, and there will be weeds whether you put down grass seed or not. When the grass first starts coming up, the weeds are generally deeper and not yet able to thrive. In several weeks, usually after the grass comes up, you'll begin to get weeds. I don't recommend putting any weed killer on such a young lawn, though. Allow the grass to thrive before you apply any chemical weed killer. I recommend waiting until the following season to begin pruning the lawn with weed killers.


Dear Rick:

This summer has been a lot hotter than the last few. How do I take care of my new lawn?

Answer:

The primary need for your lawn is water. Watering should be performed between 6 AM and 6 PM; the lawn should dry out before dark. Then you'll need several light waterings when we first install the lawn. After it is established, you can increase the watering to feature longer intervals of water, once daily. After approximately 8 weeks, change to once or twice a week for about an hour. Remember, deep watering will achieve deep roots. Another important factor is fertilizing your lawn. Your grass needs food, and fertilizer gives it a boost. You'll notice a greener lawn after you fertilize.


Learn more about our hydroseeding process!

Dear Rick:

I have been seeing a lot of small green bugs when I walk through my lawn. What can I do to get rid of them?

Answer:

Usually, a hardware or large home store will carry pesticides that show pictures of the bugs they target. If you can bring a sample to help store personnel direct you, that’s generally the best approach.


Dear Rick:

I work late and I don't always have time to water my new lawn. How often is enough?

Answer:

When I drive through your neighborhood, I'll be able to tell if you worked late too many nights in a row. A new lawn needs water and there is no way around that. It only takes a few weeks to establish the lawn. Other options to consider are timers for your sprinklers or an installed sprinkler system. See above for more information on when and how much to water.


Dear Rick:

I have a lot of geese in my area, and they've been coming up on my lawn. Will they eat the seed? Can they be harmful?

Answer:

Geese are usually not very harmful to your seed, and while they'll eat the grass, it shouldn’t be a serious hindrance to your yard. The most annoying aspect of geese is all the waste they leave behind. If the geese are walking onto your yard, consider putting up a temporary wire fence on your border to deter them from walking into your yard. You can also visit a garden center to ask about other available deterrents. We even suggest stringing a few rows of fish line between two stakes.


As they say, knowledge is power!

Dear Rick:

How often should I fertilize my lawn?

Answer:

I recommend applying a slow release fertilizer every 6-8 weeks, depending on the amount of rain or watering your lawn has received. Skip the early fall treatment so you don't risk snow mold, but then apply a final treatment in November. I offer a seasonal fertilizer package, as well.


Dear Rick:

My neighbor told me to ask for just bluegrass seed. Do you offer any seed, by itself?

Answer:

I would bet your neighbor got the wrong impression from her sales person. Bluegrass is a soft and thick grass that regrows, but it does not sprout quickly. For that reason, it is usually mixed with other seeds to allow for a quicker lawn that is very hardy. I offer several mixtures of seed and each is optimized for the amount of sun your yard receives. All of my seed mixtures feature a high percentage of bluegrass.


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